Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Those Slow Winter Months

I know this time of the year is when the fishing kind of slows down for some of us and we become involved in other things that will occupied us until spring. As most of you know I am a big movie buff, weather it is your traditional movie or documentaries concerning history or the outdoors. I also get a lot of enjoyment from watching fly fishing videos. While viewing a fly fishing video the other day involving fishing the Mayfly I discover a gold mine of information from the website On Stream Guide. Be prepared to spend some time on this site covering a lot of fly fishing information.

Another pastime of mine is watching good documentaries from the History and National Geographic channels. A few of my favorites are:


 

The Civil War ---150th Edition----This documentary traces the causes, courses as well as the major events and personalities of the American Civil War. Between 1861 and 1865, this epic American story of struggle and survival was written in blood, and in this series is told mostly from first-hand accounts and in the spoken words of the participants themselves, through their diaries, letters, and memoirs. The series concludes with Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House and the surrender of the western Confederate Army to Sherman in North Carolina in the spring of 1865. It then explores the legacy of slavery and the consequences and meaning of a war that transformed the country forever. 

 

America Before Columbus---History books traditionally depict the pre-Columbus Americas as a pristine wilderness where small native villages lived in harmony with nature. But scientific evidence tells a very different story: When Columbus stepped ashore in 1492, millions of people were already living there. America wasn't exactly a "New World," but a very old one whose inhabitants had built a vast infrastructure of cities, orchards, canals and causeways. But after Columbus set foot in the Americas, an endless wave of explorers, conquistadors and settlers arrived, and with each of their ships came a Noah's Ark of plants, animals—and disease. In the first 100 years of contact, entire civilizations were wiped out and the landscape was changed forever.

 

Trail of Tears---President Andrew Jackson enacted the Indian Removal Act which forced the Cherokee Nation to leave their homeland and relocate into unchartered territory. Many of these forced settlers suffered from exposure, disease and starvation and upon arriving in Indian Territory, they arrived with no past and no future.

 

First Landing---The Voyage from England to Jamestown

First Landing unearths the untold story of Robert Hunt's incredible sacrifice as expedition chaplain of the Virginia Company's awe-inspiring voyage to the New World - a groundbreaking trip that would result in America's first permanent English settlement in Jamestown, Virginia. The story follows Hunt's struggle to leave his young family in order to make the arduous journey by sea in 1606. While most men looked to their own needs, Hunt brought much-needed unity to the frail outpost on the James River that would in time become the United States of America.

 

The Oregon Trail Find out what it was like for the pioneers who made the daring journey across the Rocky Mountains to settle the Oregon Territory. Hear their stories of bravery, excitement, tragedy and sorrow from their actual letters and diary entries. Why were they going? What did they bring? What did they have to leave behind? Travel The Oregon Trail as they did across the plains, through the mountains and into a brand new world.

 

As I get older I find myself watching less and less commercial television. Programs that interest me fifteen years ago or more just doesn’t whole my attention anymore.
 

16 comments:

Kevin Frank said...

As I get older I seem to watch more and more PBS documentaries and cooking shows. There was one recently called Tickling the Dragons Tail. It is about the history of Uranium for when it was discovered to how it's used today. I'm not a chemistry buff but I found the doc fascinating. So much so I'm considering buying the dvd.

Walt Franklin said...

I'm with you there on those documentaries, Bill. You've listed some good ones. Much more interesting than watching commercial TV, which can be a real trap in the colder season. Thanks for the tips!

Howard Levett said...

That On Stream Guide certainly is a useful site Bill, thanks. I watch an occasional documentary but I'm pretty hooked on reruns of the soaps while I'm tying.

Lester Kish said...

Winter is a good thing. If it's forty degrees and not blowing, then off to the stream I go. If it's cooler and we've got snow, out come the snowshoes. The shorter days and crappy weather are a pleasant respite from the frantic pace of summer and fall. Other than that, I watch PBS like you guys. And, thank God for hockey season!

Bill Trussell said...

Kevin
I just found Tickling the Dragons Tail on Netflix, and placed it in my queue--thanks for sharing

Bill Trussell said...

Walt
We all should be thankful for DVD's to speed through those dam commercials. That is one reason I am feed up with commercial T.V. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Howard
I seldom find a fishing site with this much information, and this one is a gem. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Lester
You are a brave soul to fish in that kind of weather, I think I would just watch a fly fishing video and dream of spring. Thanks for the comment

Brk Trt said...

Bill it's not hard to find honest, interesting and informational programing. You just have to look.
I enjoy a walk along a stream, even without a fly rod.

Gramps Mel said...

Well, Bill, when I am tying I have to give it full focus or who knows what will crawl off the vise......

I do enjoy watching PBS outdoor oriented and history oriented programs. Not much of a movie buff anymore, though.

Thanks for the link to the fly fishing site.

Drew LooknFishy said...

I haven't really subscribed to an off season. But when I can't get out I try to research new water and travel destinations. This might sound morbid (sorry) but just about all the men in my family passed away before they could enjoy retirement. So, I'm a believer in the reverse retirement plan...do that stuff now while you can. On a side note non-resident fishing licenses are getting ridiculous...4 days of fishing is almost as much as an annual license in some states

Bill Trussell said...

Alan
I am one who has never had trouble occupying my time, I pity the individual who works all their life and never enjoys some type of hobby. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Mel
PBS, National Geographic and the History channels are forgotten channels are forgotten channels for the young viewers. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Drew
I know most of the younger fishermen fish through the winter months, but us older guys kind of back off during those cold, icy, and snowy days. I do try get in as many fishing trips as can especially now that I am getting older. As the songs says " We're Only Here For A Little While".
Yes licenses are getting ridiculous; I am going to buy a yearly licenses for the state of Tennessee, because a 3 day licenses will now cost 50.00 bucks. I will fish in Tennessee at least 6 times this next year, so I am willing to spend the 100 bucks for a year as oppose to the 50.00 many times over for the year. Thanks for the comment

Justin Carfagnini said...

Very cool, Bill! I, too, don't watch much commercial television. I prefer documentaries, too. I haven't seen any of the ones you have listed. I'm a big fan of animal documentaries, but I will transition into something else. The Oregon Trail one sounds really interesting. Some friends and I were just discussing the old computer game the other day.

Bill Trussell said...

Justin
I am also a fan animal documentaries, some of the best are the predators of the U.S. Thanks for the comment