Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Continuing The Bluegill Quest on Scenic Smith Lake



My first trip on Smith Lake today was wind out the east and bluebird skies, and we all know what that means. According to the old timers back in the day, they would always say “wind out of the east fish bite the least and wind out of the west fish bite the best” I know this has some merit because one is actually fishing behind a front that has just passed through when the wind is out of the east, and from the west the front is approaching, which means the fish are more active. The bluebird skies derive from the front that has already passed through meaning clear skies with no cloud cover, hence bluebird skies. Another factor that really plays into this scenario is the barometer. In my opinion a good fishing barometer is essential for any serious minded fisherman. I know a lot of you guys don’t have the luxury of picking and choosing the times you go fishing, which makes the wind direction and the barometer a none factor; but for individuals like me who can fish anytime during the day and year, then the wind and barometer play a big part in when I take to the water. This is not to say I don’t go on lousy days, like today but when one has the time to fish as I do, why not make the most of it chasing those bluegill, crappie, bass and trout.
 

The end result of a very slow morning--the bigger bluegills were not in the nooks and not bedding, this big bluegill was on the rock wall--I landed some smaller females but this was all I could muster for the morning--I will count this guy putting me 74 away from my quest
 

Barometer Guide
 
     High Pressure (30.50 +) = Clear Skies = Fishing Medium to Slow = Fish slowly in deeper water or near cover.
Medium Pressure (29.70 – 30.40) = Fair Weather = Normal Fishing = Test lures, baits, and techniques to see what works.
Low Pressure (29.60 -) = Cloudy/Rainy Weather = Fishing Slows = Fish slowly in deeper water or near cover.
Rising Pressure = Improving Weather = Fish Slightly Active = Fish slowly in deeper water or near cover.
Stable Pressure = Fair Weather = Normal Fishing = Best time to test lures, baits, and techniques to see what works.
Falling Pressure = Degrading Weather = Best Fishing = the fish will attack anything you throw at them. (well, pretty much)
So, what is the best barometric pressure for fishing? Answer: When it’s    between about 29.90 and 30.90 and the pressure is rapidly falling. This is when you will find the fish most active and feeding.
 

 
 
 
 
 

22 comments:

Mark Kautz-Shoreman said...

Guess I need to invest in a barometer. I do pay attention to a storm coming in though.

The Reel Fish Posse said...

Thanks for sharing the insight on the barometer reading. I get out to fish when I can, never enough, and find that if you wait around on the weather to materialize the way you prefer, then the fish spurn you. I just want to go fishing!

Bill Trussell said...

Mark
The West fronts are the key to catching more fish. thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Mel
I have a barometer and use it most every time I go fishing. The key to the barometer is setting it for your particular attitude. Hope you get out on the water soon. thanks for the comment

Trail The Outdoors said...

Great post Bill! I have a barometer mounted in the front of my boat. It is indeed an excellent tool for the avid fisherman. Glad to see you still got one on the board for the day to bring you closer to the 100 mark.

Jay said...

How would you like Kelly and I to help you with your quest on Sunday?

Howard said...

You know, many years ago I paid attention to the barometer but somewhere along way I forgot. Guess it's time to pay attention again. Thanks Bill!

Carp Aficionado said...

Great info Bill!

Brk Trt said...

Bill, I've never used a barometer but I will say that over the years I have paid attention to nature. Every living thing is effected by it.

Justin said...

A barometer is in my future also. Hoping to make it out Sunday.

Bill Trussell said...

Trail
I do use the barometer, but I still go on days when the barometer tells me that it is going to be slow---and yes the barometer gets it right 99% of the time. thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Howard
It is a good item to have with you when on those slow days you wonder why the fish are not hitting. thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Carp
thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Alan
If the wildlife is active then the fishing should be active--thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Justin
Hope the barometer helps you land more fish---thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Jay
Tried to find your email on your blog--sent me your email and we can set something up

THE RIVER DAMSEL said...

Ahhh...my partner in the barometer game! Glad you found a chart to post up. I omitted that in my post and that will be useful for readers. Tight lines!

The NOCO Nympher said...

Bill! Thanks for the helpful information. You have peaked my interest to learn more. I have to admit, barometer or not, I am going to chase some trout, as you mentioned, when I can. Thanks tons.

Bill Trussell said...

RD
A very useful fishing tool to carry alone on any type of fishing trip. thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Noco
I hope you make it out on the water soon and have a successful trip. thanks for the comment

Sen D' cruz said...

Great post. Very informative. Thanks for sharing. http://www.nzflyfishing.co.nz/

Bill Trussell said...

Sen
Glad you have it interesting and thanks for stopping by