Sunday, July 6, 2014

Fishing The Sipsey Tailrace on a Cool Morning July 3rd.

I was met today with some of the coolest weather we have had this summer on the tailrace. As I suited up I could feel the cool 65 degree temps, which was quite a contrast compared to the high humidity a couple of weeks ago which the south is famous for in July.
Walking the trail to the first access point I notice this apple tree loaded with green apples. The deer had already started eating the ones on the ground. This is the first yield I have seen on this tree.
I couldn’t have asked for a better morning to fish the Sipsey; the slight fog which hovered over the water surface was an inviting sight for me to make my first cast with the Adams.

 While working the area I notice a trout to the right of me continually breaking the surface. I really couldn’t determine what the trout was taking, because I saw to hatch at all on the surface. I know this trout was surface feeding, because I saw the bubbles it expelled as it submerged each time. Let me explain the bubble theory, Randy at the local fly shop told me sometime back that I could determine if the trout were taking anything on top by the expelled bubbles of air they release when they inhale the insects on the surface. So with this faint evidence of surface activity in front of me I begin to pursue this particular rainbow.


Getting the right drift was somewhat a problem because this trout was stationed in a narrow seam, adjacent to some faster water. I had fished this area before during early mornings but with no success because of drift problems, so today I was determined to make the right cast with the perfect drift. Casting some distance above the trout and letting the fly get that good drift through the seam finally paid off with this nice rainbow. I worked this trout for at least 15 minutes before I finally enticed him to take the dry, patience and more patience.


As I moved up the tailrace I just couldn’t resist fishing some of this fast water that I often have had success on. I have taken a couple of spills here, because of the moss covered rocks and current so I waded out with my staff extremely careful. I tied on a pheasant tail soft hackle and high stick it through some of the numerous seams in this area. I was using my 9 ft. 3 weight, to work the fly just under the surface. Fishing a wet fly is somewhat new to me and I must admit I am still in the learning process when fishing any soft hackle fly, but I am determine to become successful fishing wet flies on this tailrace. No one fishes wet flies here, so this would be a plus for me.
I decided to tie on the standard zebra midge which most everyone uses on the Sipsey. I used no indicator only a small weight to get the midge down in the fast current tight lining which brought this rainbow to hand. I really felt a sense of accomplishment for today’s trip because I reinforced my patience factor, and I continue to land trout in the fast water that no one ever fishes here. Now if I can just get my first rainbow on the soft hackle in the fast water.
 
 
 

 


 


 
 

 
 

 

18 comments:

Howard said...

Hi Bill! You are so right. Fishing is about patience and willingness to learn new tactics. I think that's what I like about fishing so much. Nice rainbow!

Mark Kautz-Shoreman said...

Good job. I'm sure the wet will produce in the future. You just need the planets aligned. That apple tree producing for the first time, or at least the first time you saw it, gives me hope for my two apple trees that have not produced in the 10 years I've had them.

Brk Trt said...

Bill nice job working that bow. When the fly is right they will take it.
Safety when wading is so important especially for us well seasoned anglers.

Pond Stalker said...

The Admiration Society continues here, Bill. Job well done on that Rainbow! I encourage safety in all wading situations. thanks for using your wading staff...............

riverwalker34 said...

I coulda used some of that patience on those large spotted bass yesterday. I saw a video on Gink and Gasoline about extending your drift without just shaking the line out. It woulda helped yesterday with the slow flow.

Atlas said...

Love your commitment to patience to learn a new style, like you I need to learn how to effectively fish a soft hackle well.

Bill Trussell said...

Howard
One that fly fishes never stops learning--thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Mark
Another tree right beside the producing tree didn't have any apples on it, to figure??? Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Alan
Yes the drift was the key to attract the trout's interest. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Mel
I never go on the tailrace without a wading staff these days. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Josh
I have found that the spots on my home lake will not take a surface fly during the summer months unless it is sitting still, which of course involves some patience for the hit. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Al
The soft hackle is never fished here so it is my next assignment on the Sipsey. Thanks for the comment

Regular Rod said...

What lovely fish! You are right about the fast water... Too good to waste by walking past it!!!

RR

Juan said...

Great job on the rainbows! I have yet to catch any rainbows on the fly this year but I'm fishing with Mark soon so I'm sure they will come!

Bill Trussell said...

Rod
I like to fish the fast water, especially with a soft hackle. Thanks for the comment

Bill Trussell said...

Juan
You are in good hands with Mark, he will put you on some trout. Thanks for the comment

Argosgirl said...

Nice fish! I am constantly having to work on the patience part of fishing :)

Bill Trussell said...

Nina
I think we all could use a course in the patience class. Thanks for the comment