Thursday, July 29, 2010

Hot Humid Day for Bluegill on the Fly

Mouth full of Moth

The weather forecast for this past Tuesday was in the high 90’s and it turned out to be 98 and soupy humid. My fishing plan to deal with the humidity and heat was leaving the house at daylight and get off the water by 10 AM. The plan worked and the fish cooperated to a point. The water temp and falling water were the factors my buddy and I was battling. I started out with the popper and Terry was using the same, neither of us had much success other than a few tiny gills and small bass. Nymphs were the most logical choice, so I switched to a green/brown moth bug, while my buddy stayed with a variation of the popper.

The Moth was the killer here!!

  I managed to land some nice bluegills off the rock walls letting the moth sink slightly beneath the surface and using a slow retrieve. It worked to perfection until the sun overtook us around 9:45 and we had to pack it in and head home. Once the sunlight hits the walls you can call it quits because it drives the fish deep. Factor in the heat and humidity down in the deep channels and you have the receipe for uncomfortable conditions. The objective of the trip was accomplished landing some huge bluegills, nice fillets for dinner and enjoying the morning outing.

10 comments:

Bill S. said...

Looks like a very nice bluegill. Great post. Thanks.

Bill Trussell said...

The 6 large bulls were all caught on the moth--wI caught numbers on a tiny popper, but my buddy and I threw all of little bait stealers back. It was a slow morning because of the heat and falling water. Thanks for the comment.

Coloradocasters said...

Spectacular gill! Love the dark colors and thick slab shape. Nicely done.

Bill Trussell said...

Hi Colorado
The colors are even more spectacular just when you pull them out of the water--the belly is a bright orange, really a special fish. I love catching them on the fly, just about as much as I do the trout. Fishing the deep clear waters of Smith in the hot summer time is a challenge but it is worth it when you get some of these brutes on from depths of 20 to 25 ft. down. You can see down 10 ft. in this lake so you need to be as stealthy as possible. Thanks for the comment.

Anonymous said...

Your buddy Midge Man showed me how to fish chironomid patterns deep on a lake by rigging a Frog Hair indicator as a slip float. You seem to like the indicator fishing, you should give it a try. He runs his larva patterns 20 sometimes 25 feet like that.

Casey said...

NICE 'gills! I've always meant to try flyfishing, just haven't got there yet. Going to start on bluegills when I do.

Nice job, Bill!

Bill Trussell said...

That is interesting, exactly how is he rigging this??? I tight line most all the time off the rock walls because usually the depth is beyond 25 ft. I am using a nymph letting it sink slowly with a 15 ft. leader. The set-up you are talking about would require a sinking line wouldn't it??

Bill Trussell said...

Hi Casey
If you ever try biuegills on the fly you will become hooked, especially in the spring when they are bedding. That is when they are the most aggresstive. They will attack anything at that time, becasue they are trying to protect their beds. Thanks for the comment.

The Average Joe Fisherman said...

Nice slab. I am usually a catch and release kind of guy, but those are some good eats!

The Average Joe Fisherman
http://averagejoefisherman.blogspot.com/
http://hubbycoach.blogspot.com/

Bill Trussell said...

Thanks Joe for the comment, check back for the recipe for these fighters on the fly. They are as good to eat as they are to catch.